Bangkok Street Food - Part 2

May 21, 2016 Ivan Teh - RunningMan 0 Comments

Bangkok Street Food - Part 2


More Bangkok Street Food that I've tried during other visits to Bangkok, Thailand, continuing from Part 1.

Miang Kham



This list includes dishes not listed in Bangkok Street Food - Part 1. Cuisine is mostly Thai.


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The Beer Archa is brewed by Cosmos Brewery as an American Lager style beer, with a pale golden colour, aroma of malts and grains, and a thin, smooth, crisp body. Taste is light and refreshing, with notes of corn, metal, and cereal, but very mild and thin overall. Watery, lacks bitterness, feels cheap.

Beer Archa



The Beer Singha is brewed by Boon Rawd Brewery as a 100% barley malt beer. With a clear straw golden colour, aroma of grains and rice, and a medium-thin, carbonated body that is crisp. Taste is light, with notes of bread, metal, and malts, goes down easily. Pairs well with spicy food!

Beer Singha



There are many brands of Coconut Chips, and largely, they consist of shaved coconut slices that are toasted, resulting in a crisp, crunchy snack with a earthy floral taste. Different flavours are often added beyond the original plain flavour, such as sea salt caramel, chocolate, honey, yoghurt, black pepper, and even bacon flavoured!

Coconut Chips



The Na Maphraw / Coconut Water is a popular, thirst quenching, refreshing beverage, great for beating the heat of the day (or night). It can be served in its own husk, drained and served in a cup, or mixed with other ingredients to create a dessert!

Na Maphraw / Coconut Water


Na Maphraw / Coconut Water



The Coconut Slushie is made by hollowing out a young coconut, then blending the coconut water and coconut meat along with ice, and a little coconut milk. It's served in the hollowed coconut shell as a refreshing, chilled beverage, and is very filling!

Coconut Slushie



The Dried Banana is a popular snack in Bangkok as well as throughout Thailand for largely historical reasons, as Thai people in the past used this method to preserve the bananas. These fruity floral sweet snacks with a soft texture are really yummy! Today, many companies use solar drying to preserve the bananas, with some adding other flavours such as chocolate or honey.

Dried Banana



The Fahk Khao / Gac Momordica Cochinchinensis is considered a super fruit, as despite its strange looks, has an abundance of Beta-Carotene, Lycopene, and Zeaxanthin, all powerful anti-oxidants. As food, it's blended as a beverage, or has its seeds cooked together with rice, imparting a bright orange colour. The fruit is also used as a base for dye, and in traditional remedies for treating eye conditions, burns, wounds, and boosting the immune system of the body.

Fahk Khao / Gac Momordica Cochinchinensis



The Tun Mon / Mulberry is a common fruit here, and is often used to make beverages, desserts, or simply eaten on its own. Commonly found in most markets, it has a sweet flavour when ripe, with a dark purple or black colour. It is also used as a base for dye.

Tun Mon / Mulberry



Insects are a common snack in Bangkok, and Thailand, sold in many street markets. The Fried Grasshoppers are crunchy and usually spiced with pepper, making them a suitable bar snack with beer, although you have to remove their legs before eating. The Fried Mealworms are like crisps or potato chips, pleasant when salted, and with an airy crunch. The Fried Silkworms have a crunchy, grainy, dry texture.

Fried Grasshoppers


Fried Mealworms


Fried Silkworms



The Gang Ga Ree Gai / Yellow Curry Chicken is a mildly spicy, savoury sweet dish, made with chicken, coconut milk, onions, potatoes, water, fish sauce, palm sugar, and Thai yellow curry paste (chili, onions, lemongrass, garlic, galangal, powdered turmeric, dried shrimp paste, coriander, cumin, salt, cinnamon). Normally served along with white rice.

Gang Ga Ree Gai / Yellow Curry Chicken


Gang Ga Ree Gai / Yellow Curry Chicken



The Hoi Tod / Fried Mussels Pancake is a popular street food dish, made with rice flour fried with corn starch, bean sprouts, garlic, soy sauce, fish sauce, eggs, and garnished with deshelled mussels and spring onions. The result is a half gooey, half crunchy, savoury salty dish, where the fresh mussels lend a slight sweetness. Pure Thai comfort food.

Hoi Tod / Fried Mussels Pancake


Hoi Tod / Fried Mussels Pancake



Similar to Kaeng Khiao Wan Gai / Green Curry Chicken, the dish of Kaeng Khiao Wan Goong Nang / Green Curry Prawn is made with similar ingredients (fresh Thai basil, green chili, coconut milk, sugar, fish sauce, eggplant, shallots, garlic, galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaf, coriander root, coriander leaves, cumin seeds, peppercorn, shrimp paste, salt, pea eggplant), except that prawns / shrimp are used instead. This mild, savoury sweet curry dish pairs well with white rice.

Kaeng Khiao Wan Goong Nang / Green Curry Prawn


Kaeng Khiao Wan Goong Nang / Green Curry Prawn



The Kang Massaman Nuer / Massaman Beef Curry may have many ingredients, but they're usually all tossed into a pot together and simmered. This savoury spicy, hearty dish contains beef chunks, water, onions, potatoes, Thail basil leaves, garlic, galangal, lemongrass, chili, peanuts, coriander seeds, fennel seeds, cloves, pepper, tamarind paste, cardamom seeds, palm sugar, fish sauce, dried shrimp paste, coconut milk, powdered cinnamon, and bay leaves. The beef is tender, with a complex, layered taste, and the spicy heat doesn't burn too long.

Kang Massaman Nuer / Massaman Beef Curry


Kang Massaman Nuer / Massaman Beef Curry



The beauty of Khao Pad Goong / Fried Rice With Prawn is the simplicity; great flavour provided by fresh ingredients. It has white rice, stir-fried with eggs, fish sauce, lime juice, soy sauce, palm sugar, garlic, tomato ketchup, onions, and garnished with fresh tomatoes and deshelled prawns. Commonly served in most casual Thai eateries.

Khao Pad Goong / Fried Rice With Prawn


Khao Pad Goong / Fried Rice With Prawn



The Khao Pod Tod / Sweet Corn Fritters are a crunchy, savoury sweet appetizer / snack, made with corn kernels, rice flour, egg, salt, and Thai basil leaves, all fried together into round fritters. Usually served with a dipping sauce of fish sauce and chili, or a sweet chili sauce.

Khao Pod Tod / Sweet Corn Fritters


Khao Pod Tod / Sweet Corn Fritters



The Khao Tang Na Tang is a simple, yet satisfiying, appetizer / snack, essentially rice crackers with a creamy, savoury pork and shrimp sauce. It consists of plain, crispy rice crackers (usually home made), while the delicious dipping sauce is made with coconut milk, tamarind paste, water, palm sugar, pepper, garlic, roasted peanuts, coriander, minced pork, chopped deshelled shrimp, fish sauce, and shallots. It's eaten by scooping the creamy sauce onto the rice crackers, then consumed in 1 mouthful.

Khao Tang Na Tang


Khao Tang Na Tang


Khao Tang Na Tang



The simple, basic, steamed Khao / White Rice usually accompanies most Thai meals. In restaurants, it's usually served in various shapes for plating decor.

Khao / White Rice


Khao / White Rice



Commonly accompanying dishes in Bangkok, as well as in North and East Thailand, Khao Win / Sticky Rice is a staple of rural Thai people. This glutinous rice is easy to prepare by steaming, and while the Khao Win Khaw / Sticky Rice White is more common, the Khao Win Sida / Sticky Rice Black is more nutritious.

Khao Win Khaw / Sticky Rice White


Khao Win Sida / Sticky Rice Black



Grilled meats are a common sight here, and both the Ki Yang Sab / Grilled Chicken Chop and Yang Moo Sab / Grilled Pork Chop feature fillets of chicken and pork respectively, grilled over charcoal. With most places, this results in a savoury but rather dry chicken, but a savoury and moist pork, due to the fat being rendered down.

Ki Yang Sab / Grilled Chicken Chop


Ki Yang Sab / Grilled Chicken Chop


Yang Moo Sab / Grilled Pork Chop


Yang Moo Sab / Grilled Pork Chop



The Thai Chinese dish of Kuai Tiao Moo / Pork Noodles features a thin, light soup / broth, with noodles (of your choice), such as sen mee khao / round white rice noodles, along with sliced pork loin, minced pork, pork meat balls, bean sprouts, pork liver, cabbage, kai-lan / Chinese kale / Chinese broccoli, braised pork, and crispy fried pork. Sometimes, fish cake or fish balls are also added. The lightness of this dish makes it suitable as a healthy fast-food, for those unwell, or those on a diet.

Kuai Tiao Moo / Pork Noodles


Kuai Tiao Moo / Pork Noodles



The Thai Chinese dish of Sup Look Chin Pla / Mixed Fish Ball Soup features a thin, light soup / broth, without noodles. It features a variety of ingredients, including fried fish cake, steamed fish cake, fish balls, cabbage, kai-lan / Chinese kale / Chinese broccoli, bean sprouts, fish dumplings, and sliced fish fillet meat. Sometimes, minced pork or pork meat balls are added. As most of the fish cake here is hand made, you get a much stronger fish flavour as compared to the factory processed versions.

Sup Look Chin Pla / Mixed Fish Ball Soup


Sup Look Chin Pla / Mixed Fish Ball Soup



For authenticity, I got the Kuai Tiao Ruea / Boat Noodles on a boat, from a seller on the river, and ate it while travelling around on the boat! This special Thai Chinese dish is unique for its soup / broth flavoured with shrimp and pig's blood. It features wun sen / glass vermicelli noodles, fish cake, fish balls, minced pork, pork meat balls, bean sprouts, shrimp, pig's blood cake, and spring onions. You can also get this without the pig's blood.

Kuai Tiao Ruea / Boat Noodles


Kuai Tiao Ruea / Boat Noodles



The Miang Kham is a traditional Thai street snack, whose name translates to 'eating many things in 1 bite'. Formerly sold in the streets, it's now more commonly found in rural areas, as well as traditional Thai restaurants. A raw, fresh leaf of phak i leut / piper sarmentosum / wild betel is used to wrap a mixture of fillings, including toasted coconut shavings, shallots, ginger, garlic, lime wedges with skin on, unsalted peanuts / cashew nuts, dried shrimp, sour green mango, and chili. A light sauce of fish sauce and palm sugar is used as dressing, and the entire package is wrapped, then eaten in 1 mouthful. Quite fun to assemble, and also very tasty, with good contrast of flavours and textures!

Miang Kham


Miang Kham



The Moo Ping / Minced Pork Skewer is a common street food in Bangkok, as well as Thailand, commonly found in most markets or along the roads. Small patties of fatty minced pork, dressed in palm sugar and fish sauce, are grilled. The savoury salty, moist fatty pork meat is incredibly delicious, with a smoky aroma, and totally unstoppable. I keep wanting more!

Moo Ping / Minced Pork Skewer


Moo Ping / Minced Pork Skewer


Moo Ping / Minced Pork Skewer


Moo Ping / Minced Pork Skewer


Moo Ping / Minced Pork Skewer



The simple but refreshing Nam By Tey / Pandan Leaf Juice is made by blending pandan / screwpine leaf with water. Mostly made in-house, where vendors can control the strength of the beverage, the lighter the colour, the lesser the strength and intensity of taste. It has a beautiful, toasted, earthy floral, slightly grassy flavour.

Nam By Tey / Pandan Leaf Juice



The Nuer Plu Pad Pong Ga Ree / Stir-Fried Curry Crab Meat is a traditional fusion dish, blending elements of Thai, Indian, and Chinese influences! Fresh, deshelled crab meat is stir-fried along with onions, garlic, scallions, spring onions, pepper, eggs, coconut milk, soy sauce, fish sauce, palm sugar, chicken stock, curry powder, Chinese celery, tapioca flour, and chili paste. This savoury salty sweet dish is incredibly flavourful, with the freshness of the crab being the key, its sweet, soft texture contrasting with the crunch of the vegetables. Pairs well with white rice!

Nuer Plu Pad Pong Ga Ree / Stir-Fried Curry Crab Meat


Nuer Plu Pad Pong Ga Ree / Stir-Fried Curry Crab Meat


Nuer Plu Pad Pong Ga Ree / Stir-Fried Curry Crab Meat


Nuer Plu Pad Pong Ga Ree / Stir-Fried Curry Crab Meat


Nuer Plu Pad Pong Ga Ree / Stir-Fried Curry Crab Meat


Nuer Plu Pad Pong Ga Ree / Stir-Fried Curry Crab Meat



The Or Suan / Fried Oyster Omelette in Bangkok, Thailand, is outstanding, due to the large, plump, juicy oysters that are freshly and readily available here. The oysters are fried along with rice flour, corn starch, bean sprouts, garlic, soy sauce, fish sauce, and eggs, made into a pancake shape, and garnished with spring onions. This dish is half gooey, half crunchy, savoury salty with some sweetness, and the oysters burst in the mouth releasing a pleasant briny taste.

Or Suan / Fried Oyster Omelette


Or Suan / Fried Oyster Omelette



The Pla Meuk Neung Ma Nao / Steamed Squid With Lime Garlic Sauce features fresh, bouncy squid, steamed with garlic, chili, lime juice, fish sauce, palm sugar, and garnished with coriander. Key to this dish is the freshness of the large, meaty squid used, even better if it comes with briny squid roe! Usually served with a dipping sauce of fish sauce and chili.

Pla Meuk Neung Ma Nao / Steamed Squid With Lime Garlic Sauce


Pla Meuk Neung Ma Nao / Steamed Squid With Lime Garlic Sauce



The Pla Muek Yang / Grilled Squid is a popular street snack, more commonly found in markets along the river. It has whole squid, marinated in fish sauce, lime juice, garlic, palm sugar, and chili, grilled over a charcoal flame, and served with crushed peanuts and cilantro. The squid takes on a savoury smoky flavour, while retaining its usual chewy, bouncy texture, but it also becomes slightly dry. Best eaten with the dipping sauce of lime juice, fish sauce, and chili.

Pla Muek Yang / Grilled Squid


Pla Muek Yang / Grilled Squid


Pla Muek Yang / Grilled Squid



The Pla Pao / Salt Crusted Grilled Tilapia Fish With Lemongrass is a common market street food, grilled in big, open charcoal fires, attracting everyone with the smoky aroma. It features a fresh, whole tilapia fish, coated in a crust of salt, all-purpose flour, and a little water, stuffed with lemongrass stalks, and kaffir lime leaves. The fish is then slow grilled over the flame, with the salt crust locking in moisture and flavour, keeping the fish tender, sweet, and moist. The salt crust is removed before serving, but as the skin retains a little of the salt, it helps to flavour the gravy and the meat, and the contrast of salty and sweet is delicious. Normally accompanied by a dipping sauce made from lime juice, palm sugar, fish sauce, soy sauce, garlic, and chili.

Pla Pao / Salt Crusted Grilled Tilapia Fish With Lemongrass


Pla Pao / Salt Crusted Grilled Tilapia Fish With Lemongrass


Pla Pao / Salt Crusted Grilled Tilapia Fish With Lemongrass


Pla Pao / Salt Crusted Grilled Tilapia Fish With Lemongrass


Pla Pao / Salt Crusted Grilled Tilapia Fish With Lemongrass



The Pla Tod Kapong / Deep Fried Whole Snapper Fish features a fresh, whole red snapper fish, marinated in a mix of corn starch, soy sauce, fish sauce, palm sugar, galangal, garlic, and pepper, then submerged in hot oil and quickly flash fried. The result is a golden brown, crispy crunchy exterior on the fish, with a savoury salty taste. The interior remains soft, tender, sweet, and moist, with the fish meat coming easily off the bones. Usually served garnished with coriander and fried garlic, along with a sour sharp dipping sauce of ginger, tamarind paste, shallots, fish sauce, water, palm sugar, and chili.

Pla Tod Kapong / Deep Fried Whole Snapper Fish


Pla Tod Kapong / Deep Fried Whole Snapper Fish


Pla Tod Kapong / Deep Fried Whole Snapper Fish



The Thai Indian dish of Roti Gulay / Banana Roti Pancake is a popular street food, usually eaten as a snack, for breakfast, or as a dessert. It features a crispy, fried dough, shaped like a pancake / crepe, made from wheat flour / plain white flour, salt, water, egg, milk, sugar, and clarified butter (Ghee). Fresh banana slices are wrapped within the fried dough, making them take on a gooey, sweet, caramelised texture. The entire dish is then dressed in sweet condensed milk, and served. Commonly eaten with hands, or with wooden skewers.

Roti Gulay / Banana Roti Pancake


Roti Gulay / Banana Roti Pancake


Roti Gulay / Banana Roti Pancake



The Yam Tua Plu / Wing Bean Salad is a Central Thai dish, featuring chopped wing beans, coconut milk, lime juice, tamarind paste, palm sugar, salt, garlic, toasted coconut, shallots, and chili, garnished with sliced pork loin and deshelled prawns. Sometimes, eggs or crushed peanuts are added. This vegetable dish is sweet sour, with a nice, satisfiying crunch.

Yam Tua Plu / Wing Bean Salad


Yam Tua Plu / Wing Bean Salad



The Thai Chinese dish of Yen Ta Fo features a thin, light soup / broth, with noodles (of your choice), such as sen mee khao / round white rice noodles, along with hand made fish cake, fish balls, fish tofu, tofu beancurd skin, kai-lan / Chinese kale / Chinese broccoli, white fungus, onions, squid, shrimp, and pig's blood cake. A bright pink sauce is used to dress the dish, which is made from palm sugar, soy sauce, fish sauce, vinegar, garlic, tomato ketchup, fermented soybean paste, and pepper. Classic Thai comfort food!

Yen Ta Fo


Yen Ta Fo



The key to a great Pu Neung / Steamed Crab is the freshness of the whole crab, which is simply steamed along with garlic. Better if the crab has a lot of roe! Served with a dipping sauce of lime juice, soy sauce, fish sauce, and chili.

Pu Neung / Steamed Crab


Pu Neung / Steamed Crab


Pu Neung / Steamed Crab



The Bami Moo Daeng Kuai Tiao / Wanton Noodles is a Thai Chinese dish, with chewy springy thin egg noodles in a clear soup / broth flavoured with pork lard, garnished with kai-lan / Chinese kale / Chinese broccoli, thinly sliced char siew / red roast pork loin, and pork wanton / wonton dumplings. What makes this dish distinctly Thai; is the addition of fish sauce and chili to the soup / broth. Simple and satisfiying street food, available nearly everywhere.

Bami Moo Daeng Kuai Tiao / Wanton Noodles



The Bua Loy / Taro Balls In Coconut Cream is a dessert of yam taro glutinous balls, served in a warm coconut milk cream soup / broth flavoured with palm sugar, and topped with a sunny side up egg. Sometimes, sesame seeds are added for a crunch to texture. This dessert is floral earthy, sweet savoury, and milky in taste. Comforting on a cold day.

Bua Loy / Taro Balls In Coconut Cream


Bua Loy / Taro Balls In Coconut Cream



A common sight at Thai economic rice street stalls, the Gang Ga Ree Moo / Yellow Curry Pork features minced pork stir-fried with basil leaves, chili, and Thai yellow curry paste (chili, onions, lemongrass, garlic, galangal, powdered turmeric, dried shrimp paste, coriander, cumin, salt, cinnamon). Taste is intensely salty savoury with a mild hit of chili spice, best eaten with white rice.

Gang Ga Ree Moo / Yellow Curry Pork


Gang Ga Ree Moo / Yellow Curry Pork



The Kha Nom Pang Ney Natal / Toast Butter Sugar and Kha Nom Pang Kra Tiem / Toast Garlic are commonly sold by hole-in-the-wall local bakeries. Both feature thin, extremely crisp slices of toasted white bread, either spread with butter and crystal sugar, or with fragrant minced garlic. Tasty, addictive snack, quite impossible to eat only 1 piece!

Kha Nom Pang Ney Natal / Toast Butter Sugar


Kha Nom Pang Ney Natal / Toast Butter Sugar


Kha Nom Pang Kra Tiem / Toast Garlic



The Kluay Ping / Grilled Banana are simply whole bananas, charcoal grilled with their skins on until the flesh becomes tender and slightly caramelised. The skins are then peeled before serving. This tasty street snack / dessert is warm and sweet, providing a quick burst of energy and sugar, as well as being rather satisfiying.

Kluay Ping / Grilled Banana


Kluay Ping / Grilled Banana


Kluay Ping / Grilled Banana



The Mah Nim Hoo Cha Lam / Claypot Shark's Fin is a Thai Chinese dish, which features a generous portion of shark's fin cartilage, in a superior soup / broth of sweet deshelled crab meat, earthy tender shiitake mushrooms, crunchy bean sprouts, sharp vinegar, and parsley. Fragrant, comforting, and decadent.

Mah Nim Hoo Cha Lam / Claypot Shark's Fin


Mah Nim Hoo Cha Lam / Claypot Shark's Fin


Mah Nim Hoo Cha Lam / Claypot Shark's Fin


Mah Nim Hoo Cha Lam / Claypot Shark's Fin



The Mah Nim Pla Kuai Tiao / Claypot Fish Noodles is a simple Thai Chinese dish, featuring a claypot of fish soup / broth, flat wide rice noodles, lettuce, Thai fish sauce, and slices of fresh fish. The fish used is often a snakehead fish, with firm white flesh and a semi-sweet earthy taste.

Mah Nim Pla Kuai Tiao / Claypot Fish Noodles


Mah Nim Pla Kuai Tiao / Claypot Fish Noodles



Fresh Pomegranate Juice is often sold along the streets. This fruity sweet, refreshing beverage helps to cool off the heat of the day.

Pomegranate Juice



The charcoal grilled Sai Krok Isan / Fermented Sausage is a North-East Thai street snack. Made with minced pork and white rice, it has a snappy casing, with a salty savoury earthy taste. Often served with crunchy raw cabbage and chili.

Sai Krok Isan / Fermented Sausage



The Thai Milk Tea Cake is a modern Thai dessert cake. Essentially, a fusion pastry of Thai milk tea infused into sponge cake, topped with Thai milk tea cream, served with either whipped cream, or a Thai milk tea sauce reduction. It has a floral, earthy sweet, tea and milk flavour. The sponge cake should be light, soft, and airy. Normally served in modern cafes here.

Thai Milk Tea Cake



The Thot Man Pla Khai Nok Krata / Thai Fish Cake With Quail Egg features a small quail egg, wrapped in a Thai Fish Cake made with minced fish paste, egg whites, long beans, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, peppercorn, salt, red chili, galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaf, coriander root, shallots, garlic and shrimp paste. This street snack has a runny egg yolk in the centre, and is rather fun to eat. Has a savoury spicy eggy flavour.

Thot Man Pla Khai Nok Krata / Thai Fish Cake With Quail Egg






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